Around Town

HAVARIE/COLLISION (LITQUAKE SF; OCTOBER 13TH, 2017, 6:00PM-8:30PM)

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Havarie. Dir. Philip Scheffner. Real Fiction Filmverleih, 2016.

The European Refugee Crisis: Havarie and the Art of Slow Cinema
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema (2550 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94110) 6:00PM-8:45PM, October 13, 2017

$15 adv./door

Moderator: Nilgun Bayraktar
Participants: Merle Kröger, Philip Scheffner

Goethe-Institut San Francisco presents a reading with Merle Kröger (Radio Bremen Crime Novel Award 2015 / German Crime Novel Award 2016) and a film screening with Philip Scheffner in collaboration with the Litquake Festival and the Center for the Art of Translation.

Inspired by a short cellphone video of a raft of refugees, shot by a tourist from the deck of a cruise ship, Merle Kröger and Philip Scheffner created both a feature film and a novel, Havarie (Collision). Scheffner’s film loops the original clip into a haunting 90-minute “slow cinema” hallucination and meditation on the nature of refugees, while Kröger’s book unspools a crime story from the same collection of characters. Kröger reads from her book, followed by a screening of Havarie, and then an onstage discussion with both Kröger and Scheffner. Moderated by CCA film professor Nilgun Bayraktar. (LitQuake 2017)

FORUM Magazine Showcase (LitCrawl SF; October 14th 2017, 6:30PM-7:30PM)

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FORUM will be participating in LitCrawlSF. On the final day of LitQuake literary festival, LitCrawl events will be hosted by venues throughout San Francisco’s Mission District.

FORUM Magazine Showcase
Adobe Books (3130 24th Street, San Francisco, CA 94110)
(Phase II) 6:30PM-7:30PM, October 14, 2017

Curators: Jen Sullivan Brych
Participants: Brianna Allen, Kevin Cosby, Zachariah Greer Hauptman, John Isles, William Petersen, Bryce Riegel, Lucretia Samuel

 The complete schedule of LitCrawlSF events after the break.

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Literature Events Around Town: Lyrical Revolt|Revuelta Lírica

It’s spring break, so no Forum lab today. Still, that’s no excuse to neglect y’all!

Seen at the 24th and Mission Muni stop:IMG_1809

Answer Coalition presents:
Lyrical Revolt|Revuelta Lírica

An evening of progressive poetry, spoken word and vocal performances for social justice.

Una noche de poesía, palabra oral y expresión creativa.

2969 Mission St, San Francisco (between 25th and 26th Streets)

April 1, 2017 7:00 pm
Open mic sign up starts at 6:00pm

Get Lit – Get Lucky

Hi there, fellow writers!  

Did you know that Litquake, San Francisco’s annual literary festival, is hosting their first-ever literary singles night?  What’s that you say?  You haven’t?  Well, let us tell you about it.

It will be a night of writerly bliss, featuring a lineup of guests that includes Alia Volz, the former host/producer of Literary Death Match.  It’s a chance to have a night out with fellow writers and literary nerds.  Bring a friend (for a $5 discount) or meet some there for a night of fun icebreakers, cocktails, and conversation.

Litquake is hosting it’s very own version of the ‘Literary’ Dating Game, during which you can watch or even join contestants to compete for a date with one of six sexy authors. They guarantee you won’t be leave empty handed, whether you go home with a fun prize, a date, a new friend, or even a fun story to tell.

Come September 20th to the Verdi Club (2424 Mariposa Street) at 7:00 pm for a night of lively entertainment!

For more information on becoming a ‘Literary Dating Game’ contestant and to see who else is going to Lit Singles Night check out their page at https://www.facebook.com/events/281973938610193/.

México: Política y Poética

Modern and Contemporary Works on Paper and Animations

By Katie Dalla, Forum Poetry Editor

It’s not often that an art exhibit representing a country goes to the extent of actually showcasing remains of its own citizens.

No, nobody’s limbs were severed and put on a podium, but Teresa Margolles’ vibrant yet grotesque 2003 piece, Papeles, brings you bodily fluids in a surprisingly beautiful arrangement.

The piece takes up a whole wall and displays large rectangular sheets containing streaked patterns of brown and yellow hues that, juxtaposed together, bring to mind the splendor of a moth’s wings. But the beauty is met with an equal amount of repulsion: Margolles used the post- autopsy water from the victims of narcoviolencia—or those individuals that experienced the fatal repercussions of drug trafficking. The water came right from the Mexico City morgue.

Each paper represents an individual portrait of a person and their remaining traces of life. You can’t help but feel a bit tricked — your first feeling is sheer warmth from the luminosity and size of the work, but as you step in closer to read the details, you immediately get a lump in your throat and feel the need to back away slowly, frantically searching for mutual glances of horror from the other onlookers. Margolles’ bold statement effectively demands a reaction to an ongoing issue that has caused so many deaths and so much strife in Mexico. She also gives an odd vibrance to each portrait as she has, in fact, captured their final essence, and in the most direct way possible, Margolles brings a part of Mexico to you.

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Curious George Saves the Day

by Joseph Ramelo

“Now they were right in the center of town. There was so much to see that George did not know where to look first.” (from Curious George Takes A Job)

This weekend, the starving student and Bank of America customer that I am paid a visit to the Contemporary Jewish Museum for its “Curious George Saves the Day” exhibit, which runs through March 13. Through the Museums On Us program, on certain weekends you can get into certain museums for free, and this past weekend I decided that my free museum visit would be to the CJM.

I was excited the first time, last month, that I saw the streetlight banner ads for this exhibit waving throughout downtown San Francisco. In addition to the fact that the Curious George books were among my favorites (I can distinctly remember first coming across them in the library of my elementary school when I was in the first grade), Margaret and H.A. Rey are key literary figures. In the literary community, children’s books authors don’t always get the kind of recognition that their mainstream peers do, unless they are staples such as Lewis Carroll and Laura Ingalls Wilder. (In fact, the work of both Wilder and the Reys are nearly contemporaneous.) Also complicating matters is when the authors are also the illustrators. Are the authors staples of literature or art? The Reys took as much care with their drawings as they did with their prose. For example, Margaret had once explained the challenge of writing for children: that she had a very limited vocabulary to choose from because the target audience wasn’t yet accustomed to using a wide variety of verbs and adjectives. Personally, I would conclude that the Reys are key literary figures, if not heroes, for mastering this unique narrative structure. (more…)