Online Editor

Meet The Editors 2017 [Part One]

Our first round of introductions covers the three editors whose purview is multi-genre!

Oyunbileg (Obo) Shirendev is our Managing Editor
The Managing Editor builds and maintains a log of all work received, directs all submissions to make sure they are received by the appropriate editors, and proofs work for accuracy. She also oversees communication with authors and artists.

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Originally from UB, Mongolia– the land of the blue sky and endless steppe– Obo has made San Francisco her second home. She is majoring in Child Development and Creative Writing at CCSF. She loves reading, films, fashion, traveling and art. People like Martin Luther King Jr, Mahatma Gandhi, Dalai Lama,  Malala Yousafzai, Jhumpa Lahiri, Salvadori Dali, and Frida Kahlo inspire her. She also believes in the power of helping others and supporting one another through unconditional kindness.

Whenever she has free time besides school and work, she travels and think that experience is something that makes her grow as a person. Not only does she enjoy traveling but also learning about different cultures, the way of life and meeting new people. She works as a part time Applied Behavioral Analysis therapist with children who are autistic. She wants to be a good therapist, counselor, teacher and educator in the near future.

“Be the change you want to see in the world” 

 

Carolina Pistone is our General Editor
The General Editor directs the project, serving as overseer of the magazine as a whole. She  works with layout editors and attends meetings with the Graphics Department. In coordination with Faculty Advisors and the other editors, she develops the policies to establish and support the quality and vision of Forum Magazine.

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Carolina Pistone was born in Argentina, raised on the East Coast of the United States (north and south), and is currently life-ing in San Francisco. She loves croissants, probably too much for the well-being of any one individual and doesn’t like the smell of bananas. She likes people, animals (she has three cats), books, art, design, movies (The Land Before Time gets her every time!), authentic conversations, and did we mention croissants? She also likes to write sometimes. She plans to one day die of croissant overload.

 

Zach Hauptman is our Social Media/Web Editor
The Web Editor is in charge of keeping our social media and blog alive and growing. In conjunction with the Managing, General and Genre-specific Editors, they organize and plan social media postings, including photos, literary selections and calendars of events. Also, they’re very cute.

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Zach Hauptman is an Electronic Resources Librarian at Touro University by day, a CCSF student at night, and a gigantic genderqueer nerd at all times (they/them pronouns, pls!). With their group, Truth Sans Justice, they run panels on popular culture, misogyny and the queer community, and write LARPs that run in and around the SF Bay Area. In their copious free time, they write poetry, short fiction and snarky blogs about social issues.

Rejection Letters Sent to Famous People

It’s not easy receiving that cursed rejection letter in the mail, and often times it’s no easier for a publication to decide not to publish your piece.  No matter if you ever receive a rejection letter from us or any other publication.  It certainly doesn’t mean you lack talent, drive or a great career in the arts.  Don’t believe me?  The take a look at this great Mental Floss piece highlighting 10 rejection letters sent to 10 of our most beloved authors, musicians and artists.  Click the image for the full article.  Good luck to all of you in your bright, creative endeavors!

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Introducing the Editors for Spring 2014

Introducing our team of editors for the Spring 2014 issue of Forum Magazine!  These are the people who, thanks to your contributions and the help of the graphics department on campus, are able to put together this fantastic magazine every semester.

Katerina Argyres
General Editor

Katerina Argyres is currently enrolled in CCSF and SF State. When she’s not studying, working, or entertaining her dog she likes to watch old movies set in San Francisco and cook. She is currently on a detective novel spree. It is inspiring her to write short mysteries and narrate her daily activities like she is in a noir film.
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Kristine Nodalo
Managing Editor
Drama and Visual Arts Reader

Kristine Nodalo has been living in San Francisco for ten years, but has continually failed to find the cool places where the cool kids hang out. In her spare time, she likes to hole up in her room with a pizza all to herself while watching Downton Abbey. You’ll usually find her hungry and searching for more food, or with her nose in a book.

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Virginia Carrillo
Assistant Managing Editor
Poetry Reader

Virginia Carrillo currently works at a public library. She is a student at City College of San Francisco and wishes to obtain a bachelor’s in English literature.  Her house is currently infested with literature books and cats, all around!

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Leith Mahoney-Maver
Social Media Editor
Assistant Non-Fiction Editor

The daughter of two hippies from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the third of four children, left-handed, and she once met David Sedaris while living in Paris, which has been a life highlight.  She writes about all of it in a blog called The San Franciscan.
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Osiris Walls
Fiction Editor
Assistant Drama Editor
Poetry Reader

not unlike the moon
dark, pulsing clouds will reveal
My Incandescence
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Brian Fidler
Drama Editor
Assistant Fiction Editor

Brian currently studies English at CCSF and lives in Oakland.
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Sara McKinney
Poetry Editor

 Writes, paints, and sings in San Francisco. A South Carolina native, she loves life in the city, but will never forget home. Her favorite color is all of them, and 2014 is going to be her year.

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Elise Stewart
Non-Fiction Editor
Visual Arts Co-Editor

 Since graduating from San Francisco State with a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature in 2012, Elise has endeavored to find employment that, in some way or another, would help to facilitate her unwavering wanderlust. After a number of ill-fits–including a short, yet soul-crushing stint as a slampiece in the tech world; a demeaning personal assistantship for a racist psychiatrist; and a dismal temp job at a bridesmaid-dress startup–she has cycled back to the academic bubble. Eager to reassume a place among those with full heads and empty stomachs, Elise has ungrudgingly shelved her travel plans to reenter the figurative space she feels most at home in: that of visual arts and literature.
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Bryan Makishi
Assistant Non-Fiction Editor
Assistant Fiction Editor

 Bryan likes to find good books at garage sales and at his coin laundromat’s “Take a book Leave a book” table.
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David Chang
Visual Arts Co-Editor

A facetious person.  Self-proclaimed “cool” (more like borderline narcissistic), he will always do his best to give you a good time and a good laugh.
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Gary Baker
Business and Fundraising Manager
Events Coordinator

Born in the East Bay, Gary has lived all 48 years of his life in the Bay Area.  A baseball fan, softball player, music aficionado and pop culture junkie, Gary is also a former music marketing professional. Gary has returned to college to be an English teacher at the high school level. This is his third year as a part-time student at CCSF, and he will be transferring to SFSU in the fall.

Week 16: At Semester’s End

by Ayo Khensu-Ra

Monday was the final class period for Forum this semester. In a way it’s hard to believe it’s all over and done with but within a week we (and you) could be holding a copy of the completed magazine, the very thing all that work was for.

Monday was the last class but it was far from typical. We talked about a few things, the upcoming reading, handed in final portfolios, got old work back. It was a quiet evening far removed from all those nights filled with proofreading, discussion and decision. In the past we’ve had food and drink on the last day of class; once we went out for coffee. In other words, this end of semester was slightly anticlimactic as life often is. There is also the upcoming reading at L’s Caffee which should make for a bit of a celebration. I suppose I’m commenting on the strangeness of ending up somewhere that is quite different from where we started. But could it really happen any other way? It was dark when class broke up on the first night and now that it’s another season, it was still light on that final day (also class ended a bit earlier). Time marches on. And cliché as it may sound I certainly learned new things about myself and about the process of producing Forum even though it wasn’t my first rodeo.

Although before I go suggesting the destination isn’t important I should probably say that in this case it is — the destination being the magazine. It’s almost here and again, you can pick up a copy next Thursday at the reading at L’s Caffee. I think I can speak for the entire Forum staff when I say I hope you’ll enjoy it.

Weeks Five and Six

by Ayo Khensu-Ra

Week Five
As I’ve noted before, the our class time has been much reduced thanks to three holidays in the early part of the semester. And in week four* we had our reading as chronicled so well by Michael…Finally we were back to a more regular class and it was much needed in the poetry group as we had only had one short session thus far. Kaylo and I are co-poetry editors and we’re joined by readers Monty and Kristine — Kristine being a late and much welcome addition to the group. We shuffled off to an empty classroom to get down to discussion. Class meets in a computer classroom which has its benefits but isn’t the most condusive to discussion. How much can I really write about talking? Probably not a whole lot. I will say that the discussion is one of the things I always find the most interesting and stimulating — talking about what works and what doesn’t in a given poem, hearing different perspectives, views I perhaps would not have come to. We got through several submissions and, excitingly, we got our first solid ‘yes’ of the semester. We did have some strong ‘maybes’ in our first session but in week five were the first we all really liked, the first pretty much assured to be going into the magazine. Of course, time was still short and while we got plenty done there was still much more to do…

 

Week Six


And considering all there was to do, I was a tad worried during the week. It bears mentioning that we had to have a pretty good idea of what was going in by the end of class on Monday. An out-of-class meeting would’ve helped but that didn’t quite square with everyone’s schedules but Monty and I met before class and narrowed the field a bit. In class, we were joined by Steve who kindly offered to lend a hand (and read all the submissions in a day or so (90+). It was another good discussion, once again taking place in an empty room. There were plenty more ‘yeses,’ a lot of good poetry, a lot of agreement, some healthy disagreement and when time was up we had a pretty good idea of what was going in.

We also had an assignment to critique a short story and the whole class talked about the assignment and story itself (more the story than the assignment.) The class wheeled our chairs out from behind the desks and formed a circle — or perhaps more of an oval — to talk. The story was interesting from a technical standpoint, and engendered various reactions from the class.

*I am counting only weeks we have actually had class, perhaps it would be more precise to say class number five but I think week five sounds better. 

Week Two

by Ayo Khensu-Ra

Yes, there was a week two. Several people have joined up and apparently we’re now fine on numbers so we get to keep doing this.

This week Jen taught the class and she announced the filling of a few of the key editing positions based on applications we completed last week. Several, like me, are returning for another semester with Forum — Michael Thomson the new general editor; one of the two managing editors Kat Cabral;  fiction editors Chanelle Loftness and Truc Nguyen. In addition, a new guy Howard Halverson is the other managing editor. Forum is also a club and the club officers also bear mentioning — president Tim St. Croix,  treasurer Steve Pineda and club rep Travis Jones.

So, it was down to business. Kyanne Rose, last semester’s managing editor stopped by to show a thing or two to the new managing editors,  submissions began to be distributed to be read by the staff, some looking into visiting classes in order to solicit submissions, some visited classes and put up more flyers. As you can tell, there are already a million things to do and to borrow a phrase from one of our previous general editors, we’re already behind  since we opened the semester with two Monday holidays in a row and hence didn’t have a class until the third week of the semester. At any rate, the crew seems energetic and well-motivated — onward!

Week One

by Ayo Khensu-Ra

Well this is embarrassing. I scheduled this post for tonight without actually writing the post and thus it went up without there being much any text. Why is it a post for last Friday when it’s clearly Tuesday? Long story but in mostly unrelated news last night was the first night of class for English 14, the class that produces Forum. It was all very familiar and also different in some unexpected ways. As is typical for just about any class, we went over the syllabus, discussed what would we would be doing in class and we took part in an introductory exercise. That was all expected but on the other hand, there were a number of Fourmites who, like me, were back for another round. On some level I’d thought it would be nice to see some familiar faces but I had no  idea I would be as happy as I was to see my “old” classmates (it’s not like it has been that long since we’ve been classmates) and our faculty advisors Jen Sullivan Brych and John Isles.

There were also new people and it was nice meeting them. There are issues however — in such tight budgetary times, there’s little leeway for classes without sufficient enrollment and unfortunately that may be English 14. So if you’re a City College student and have any interest in publishing, in assembling a literary magazine or if you’re a former Forum staffer ready to come back into the fold, we could really use you. Class meets Mondays at 5:30 in ARTX 265.

And as the ‘Week One’ at the top of the page might indicate, this is the first in what I hope will be a regular feature here on Boeotia —  a weekly chronicle of the goings on in class, a look behind the scenes…that is assuming there’s a class to write about. Sorry, I’m ending on a bit of a downer.