Visual Arts Editor

Photography: The Quarterback by Ted Herzberg

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The Quarterback by Ted Herzberg

Ted Herzberg is the photographer of The Quarterback and St. Slim. He has had a long history with City College. In the late ’70’s Ted took life drawing classes at Fort Mason and in the mid-90’s an acrylic painting class there. He has taken ti chi classes at the main college and on 18th St. at various times. He took senior computer classes at the Oakdale campus about ten years ago. Ted also appeared as Trotsky in the musical Frida and Diego in the Diego Rivera Theatre. The last classes Ted took at the main campus was a semester of Cantonese about seven years ago.

Photography: St Slim by Ted Herzberg

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St Slim by Ted Herzberg

Ted Herzberg is the photographer of The Quarterback and St. Slim. He has had a long history with City College. In the late ’70’s Ted took life drawing classes at Fort Mason and in the mid-90’s an acrylic painting class there. He has taken ti chi classes at the main college and on 18th St. at various times. He took senior computer classes at the Oakdale campus about ten years ago. Ted also appeared as Trotsky in the musical Frida and Diego in the Diego Rivera Theatre. The last classes Ted took at the main campus was a semester of Cantonese about seven years ago.

Painting: Lorena by Talavera Ballón

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Lorena by Talavera Ballón

Talavera-Ballón is a Peruvian painter based in San Francisco. A disciple of  Palao Berastain, he captures the essence of ordinary people’s lives across diverse regions and cultures of the Americas. He explores themes that highlight social and cultural aspects of the people and places he has encountered. His work is also a tribute to immigrants like himself who left their home countries in search of new horizons.
Affiliation to CCSF: former ESL student

Textile Art: Comet by Trudi Hauptman

Copy of Visual Arts – Comet – Fabric

Comet by Trudi Hauptman

Trudi Hauptman is anchored in modern feminist Jewish sensibilities of spirituality and a commitment to social justice with an understanding that one’s life is Hanging By A Thread, this work comes from the soul. As an artist, she is involved with fiber crafts and is a member of NOCA Women’s Caucus for The Arts; Surface Design Association;  and the Pointless Sisters Guild. Her child is a student in CCSF’s Creative Writing Program

Meet the Editors 2017 [Part Two]

Today we’re meeting the head genre editors!

These talented folx are in charge of maintaining the submission logs of their specialty, organizing the submissions, and leading reader discussions. They’re also responsible for editing, author revisions, proofreading, and work in conjunction with the Managing Editor to communicate with authors and artists.

Bryce Riegel is our Fiction Editor

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Bryce presides over the brilliant fiction crowd.

Bryce Riegel moved to San Francisco 7 years ago for school (with a B.S. in biochemistry with a physics minor). He’s now a carpenter and spends most of his time remodeling houses and apartment buildings in the city. In his free time he’s either writing short stories or reading them.

 

Kriz Natalie Monrose is our Nonfiction Editor

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Kriz Natalie, excited to get to work on the Non-Fiction pieces

Kriz Natalie Monrose is your Transgender gender fluid non-fiction editor! Thank you for reading this blog. She likes all animals, especially cats and snakes! She’s looking for a husband. To apply, email submissions@forumccsf.org.

 

Kevin Cosby is our Poetry Editor

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Kevin Cosby lives and works in San Francisco. He recently #####%%&&
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Meredith Brown and Lulu Samuel are our joint Visual Arts Editors

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Lulu (front) and Meredith (back)

Lucretia Rhys Samuel is a Visual Arts Editor on this edition of Forum. She is a poetry-writer and a zine-maker residing in the Richmond District of San Francisco. She is currently studying Creative Writing and Visual Media Design at CCSF, working at the San Francisco SPCA, and spending too many hours hogging the xerox machine at the public library publishing her own zines.

Meredith Brown

Meredith gave me an actual picture!

Meredith Brown is a lifelong learner from Tracy, CA. She believes in empathy, art and science.

Editors Write: Craving IV

Forum Magazine is proud to present to you our fourth installment of “Editors Write,” this time Forum’s Non-Fiction Editor and Visual Arts Co-Editor, the wonderful Elise Stewart.

This piece was inspired by the prompt “craving.”  Please take a look, and always feel free to post your own work in the comments section below, or send it to submissions@forumccsf.org, subject heading “Writing Prompt Wednesday.”  Thanks, and enjoy!

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“Craving and aversion are the source of your misery. Remain perfectly equanimous.”
I took a 10-day silent meditation course and hoped it would answer all my questions and solve all my woes.
“Scan the body,” asserted the teacher. “You may feel unpleasant, gross sensations; do not react with aversion. You may feel pleasant, subtle sensations; do not react with craving. You will only multiply your misery.”
One night I woke up tapping my knuckles against the wall in my dorm. I wondered if I’d woken anyone else up. I wanted to hug the girl in the dorm next to mine, who I had met right before we entered silence: “Le Chaim,” she said, as we walked up to the meditation hall for the first time. “Le Chaim,” I repeated back, realizing that Chaim now not only came at the end of the course, but book-ended it.
I wanted desperately to hug her when I woke up knocking on the wall. I wanted to hug my mom, and the guy who I had gone on two dates with before I left. I chided myself for craving these hugs. I developed an aversion to the craving. “Do not react. You will only multiply the misery. Do not react.”
I left the night before the end of the course. I told them I needed to be with my family, and that I could not be late. They said they would not allow it–that I was rebelling. I thanked them for the free food, and showed them my keys.
At the cemetery the next morning, I craved my uncle’s presence, and felt an aversion to his absence. Only, I welcomed this misery as a compliment to the joy that also existed within me, in remembering my time with him. “You are allowed to react,” I thought to myself, as they unveiled Chaim’s headstone.