CCSF’s Creative Writing Program Visiting Writer Series, presents Poet Michael Leong!

Poet Michael Leong

Reading plus Q&A

Thursday, April 8th, 2021

6:00 PM

Free and open to the public

Michael Leong is the author of the critical study Contested Records: The Turn to Documents in Contemporary North American Poetry (University of Iowa Press, 2020) and the poetry books e.s.p. (Silenced Press, 2009), Cutting Time with a Knife (Black Square Editions, 2012), Who Unfolded My Origami Brain? (Fence Digital, 2017), and Words on Edge (Black Square Editions, 2018). His creative work has been anthologized in THE &NOW AWARDS 2: The Best Innovative Writing (Lake Forest College Press, 2013), Best American Experimental Writing 2018 (Wesleyan University Press, 2018), and Bettering American Poetry, Volume 3 (Bettering Books, 2019). His co-translation, with Ignacio Infante, of Vicente Huidobro’s long poem Sky-Quake: Tremor of Heaven was published by co•im•press in 2020. He has received grants from the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Join us on Zoom through Eventbrite

Fiction Reading with Mimi Lok

The Creative Writing Program at City College of San Francisco is delighted to host a reading and discussion with fiction writer Mimi Lok!

Mimi Lok is the author of the story collection Last Of Her Name, published October 2019 by Kaya Press. She is the winner of the 2020 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut short story collection, a California Book Award silver medal, and a Smithsonian Ingenuity Award. She is also a finalist for the 2020 National Magazine Award, Northern California Book Award, and CLMP Firecracker Award. Mimi’s work can be found in McSweeney’s, Electric Literature, Lucky Peach, Hyphen, the South China Morning Post, and elsewhere. She is currently working on a novel. Mimi is also the founding director and executive editor of Voice of Witness, an award-winning human rights & oral history nonprofit that amplifies marginalized voices through a book series and a national education program. UK-born and raised, she has lived and worked in China and is currently based in the US.

When

Tue, March 2, 2021
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM PST

Where

Register on Eventbrite to access the Zoom invitation!
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fiction-reading-with-mimi-lok-tickets-142303362187

2021-03-02T19:00:00

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GET LIT

Lit Night is back! Have you been churning out poems and stories and essays that you are desperate to share ? Are you perhaps looking for inspiration and a regular meet up with fellow writers?

Next Lit Night fun is March 15th. The theme is PERFECT MATCH.

Visit litnight.org for themes, dates and Zoom links!

Lit Night is every third Monday from 7:30-9:00PM

Come join the fun!

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STATEMENT TO OUR COMMUNITY REGARDING ALAN CHAZARO READING

Alan Chazaro

February 16, 2021

To the CCSF and Forum Community,

The English Department and the Creative Writing program at City College wish to extend our apologies to all of you who attended Alan Chazaro’s poetry reading on Thursday, February 11th. We felt honored to have Alan read for us since, in addition to being a talented poet, he attended community college and went on to write about growing up in the Bay Area as a Mexican American. Alan received the Lawrence Ferlinghetti Scholarship at the University of San Francisco because of his focus on and commitment to social justice issues in America, and it is clear he is someone that many of us can see ourselves in and that he is a truly inspirational man.

In fact, Alan represents much of what we stand for at City College—a commitment to social equity and diversity. We are proud of our tradition of presenting writers of all races, ethnicities, and gender identities. For this reason, the attack on the reading that occurred when a group of intruders disrupted and insulted the poet and viewers, represents an assault on our values. As you may know, the group took over the Zoom screen and projected racist and pornographic images while they verbally attacked all present in the chat. This was a hate filled act that has no place at any college, let alone City College. City College’s Visiting Writers’ Series is about inclusivity and about presenting diverse voices that will help students, faculty, and Bay Area residents build a supportive and inclusive community based on love and acceptance.

We wish to extend deep and heartfelt thanks to Alan Chazaro for the generous gift of his poems and much gratitude to our audience for their patience and support. It was amazing to hear students immediately reject the intruders’ hate and turn to highlighting the connections they could make to his life and poems. It was inspiring to hear many of you mentioning favorite passages.

We strongly condemn these racial attacks on our presenter and audience members. After reflecting on the intrusion, we have made the following changes to how our online Visiting Writers’ Series events will be managed:

· All participants will be muted throughout the events and will be individually unmuted if they have raised their hand during the Q and A.

· Participants will not be able to change their screen names during an event.

· Participants will not be able to screenshare.

· At least one faculty member will manage the waiting room and settings while another hosts the event.

· All faculty hosting or cohosting a reading will be trained to manage disruptions.

· Chat may be restricted to the host only and disabled entirely if abused.

· Removed participants will not be able to rejoin the event.

· Members of the public will be required to register for the event with their full name and email address before receiving the Zoom link and password.

· Participants without first and last names in their profile will not be allowed in the meeting.

· Any attendee who attempts to disrupt the event will be reported to Zoom and our IT department as well as CCSF administrators.

We hope that all of you—and anyone who attends any of the English Department’s future events—will feel safe knowing that we have put in place measures to ensure that such intrusion will never occur again. We are dedicated to bringing a diverse range of writers—writers of all races, gender identifications, and religions—who honor inclusivity and the power of literature to bring people together in the spirit of love—and never hate.

Sincerely,

CCSF Creative Writing Program and English Department

LAUNCH PARTY: Pictures and Recap

Wow! We had an amazing turn out at our Fall 2019 Launch Party last week. The back room of Alley Cat Books was full to the brim. We got to hear some of the amazing local voices published in print and on the blog and some spontaneous Open Mic readers from our CCSF community. All the literary fun was accompanied by delicious food and drinks. We also got a chance to see some of the impressive short films that we’ll be publishing on the blog–stay tuned!

If you missed your chance to grab the newest issue, don’t despair! You can pick up your copy, still fresh off the press, from Alley Cat Bookstore and Gallery or the English Lab in the Rosenberg Library at the Ocean Campus.

Also, Forum magazine is an entirely student-produced magazine. The Forum class is just one of many creative writing classes offered by the English department at CCSF!

Looking for a certificate? Taking the Forum class and others like it will get you the Creative Writing Certificate. You can get more information here. Check out the Spring 2020 schedule, and register for some classes! We’ll see you in the spring!

Finally, many thanks are due to those who made this issue so beautiful, inspiring, and memorable. Thank you to the entire Forum team, our hardworking editors, our even harder working instructors, and especially our Visual Media Design partners. But most of all, thank you to all the creators out there who let us publish your work. This wouldn’t be possible without you!

Check out some pictures from the night.

©Tigran Demurjian

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Tommy Orange: Pics and Recap

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©Tigran Demurjian

Wow! We had the immense honor of hosting Tommy Orange, author of There, There, at City College this past Wednesday. Mr. Orange was interviewed by CCSF instructor, activist, and author Benjamin Bac Sierra. He spoke about his recent novel and his plans for the future. This was great opportunity for the writers in the crowd because Mr. Orange spoke extensively about his writing process, the books and writers that have influenced him, and how he applies his past experience as a musician to his writing today. Mr. Orange then read a passage from his novel. It was amazing to see an author read their own work how they intended it to be read; his reading was powerful and inspiring. The event was concluded with a Q&A and book signing session.

This is only one of the many amazing events that Forum is involved with! Stay tuned for more–check the blog and our social media! And don’t forget about our Launch Party on December 18th 2019, from 6-9PM @Alley Cat Bookstore in the Mission District. Save the date!

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Photos ©Tigran Demurjian

TOMMY ORANGE @ CCSF

We have the immense honor of hosting Tommy Orange, Pulitzer Prize Finalist and author of There, There, at CCSF’s Ocean Campus. Come join Forum for the unique opportunity to hear a local author speak about this beautiful novel, on Wednesday Novemeber 20th, from 10:30 to 12:30, @ the Diego Rivera Theater at the Ocean Campus.

From the City College website:

“Tommy Orange is the author of There There, a multi-generational, relentlessly paced story about a side of America few of us have ever seen: the lives of urban Native Americans. Pulitzer Prize Nominee and one of The New York Times’ top books of 2018, There There shows us violence and recovery, hope and loss, identity and power, dislocation and communion, and the beauty and despair woven into the history of a nation and its people. Orange talks about his craft, the writing process, and Native American history and culture, often meticulously researched visual presentations.”

Members of the Forum team will be there! Stay tuned for a recap and pictures!

The event is free and open to the public.

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Queer Writing+AIDS Crisis Call For Submissions

 

 

Between Certain Death and a Possible Future:
Queer Writing on Growing up with the AIDS Crisis
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Hi all! Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore is looking to collect stories that narrate the queer experience in association with the AIDS crisis! Below is a description of the project, as well as guidelines, and Mattilda’s personal background. CHECK IT OUT!

Every queer person lives with the trauma of AIDS, and this plays out intergenerationally. Usually we hear about two generations—the first, coming of age in the era of gay liberation, and then watching entire circles of friends die of a mysterious illness as the government did nothing to intervene. And now we hear about a current generation growing up in an era offering effective treatment and prevention, and unable to comprehend the magnitude of the loss. We are told that these two generations cannot possibly understand one another, and thus remain alienated from both the past and the future. But there is another generation between these two—one growing up in the midst of the epidemic, haunted by the specter of certain death. A generation growing up with AIDS suffusing desire, internalizing the trauma as part of becoming queer. And these are the personal stories I’d like to collect in this book—accounts that overlap with the more commonly portrayed generations, and offer a bridge between.

By telling this specific generational story in all its complications, how do we explore the trauma the AIDS crisis continues to enact, and imagine a way out? How do race, class, gender, sexuality, age, ability, religion, ethnicity, indigeneity, rural/urban experience, regional/national origin, Global South/Global North perspective, HIV status, and access to treatment and prevention (over time and in shifting contexts) shape personal experience? What is excluded from the glorified myth of progress that now reigns?

How does the impact of growing up with the AIDS crisis continue to affect those left out of the white picket fence version of respectability promoted by dominant “LGBTQ” institutions? How does this apply to sex work, migration, public sex, cruising spaces and apps, abuse and survival, incarceration, reproductive health, homelessness, activism, drug use and addiction, subcultural striving, gay bar culture, HIV criminalization, and hierarchies within gay/queer/trans cultures?

Any generational frame offers only a partial truth, and I’m especially interested in the gaps between accepted narratives and lived experience. As a generation coming of age both with and without the internet, how has technology changed our lives, for better and worse? How does stigma against HIV-positive people continue today, and does the rhetoric around “undetectability” further exclusion rather than ending it? Who is dying of AIDS now, in spite of “AIDS Is Over” rhetoric? Has the energy around PrEP shifted the focus of public health campaigns away from demanding a cure for HIV? How could a meaningful intergenerational conversation about HIV/AIDS take place? What would communal care actually look like?

I’m interested in your most intimate stories, and your most personal fears—what you’re afraid to say is what I want to hear.

About the Editor: Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore (mattildabernsteinsycamore.com) is the author of three novels and a memoir, and the editor of five nonfiction anthologies. Her memoir, The End of San Francisco, won a Lambda Literary Award, and her widely hailed anthologies include Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots?, That’s Revolting!, and Nobody Passes. Her latest novel, Sketchtasy (one of NPR’s Best Books of 2018), is about this generation between certain death and a possible future.

Guidelines: Please submit nonfiction personal essays of up to 5000 words, as Word attachments (no PDFs, please), to nobodypasses@gmail.com. Contributors will be paid for their work, and will receive copies of the book. Feel free to contact me with any queries. The deadline for submissions is March 1, 2020, but the sooner the better!