Category Archives: Events

great events coming up for Forum

CCSF Creative Writers’ Reading Series

You are invited to this fall’s Reading Series!

If you’re an avid reader or if you’re interested in anyone of the authors in this year’s lineup, join us to learn about them and to hear more about their work. You can find more information about each guest and their work in the image below.

The link to each event will be posted here on Forum three days in advance so make sure you check back with us for the link! For any further questions, comment below.

LAUNCH PARTY: Pictures and Recap

Wow! We had an amazing turn out at our Fall 2019 Launch Party last week. The back room of Alley Cat Books was full to the brim. We got to hear some of the amazing local voices published in print and on the blog and some spontaneous Open Mic readers from our CCSF community. All the literary fun was accompanied by delicious food and drinks. We also got a chance to see some of the impressive short films that we’ll be publishing on the blog–stay tuned!

If you missed your chance to grab the newest issue, don’t despair! You can pick up your copy, still fresh off the press, from Alley Cat Bookstore and Gallery or the English Lab in the Rosenberg Library at the Ocean Campus.

Also, Forum magazine is an entirely student-produced magazine. The Forum class is just one of many creative writing classes offered by the English department at CCSF!

Looking for a certificate? Taking the Forum class and others like it will get you the Creative Writing Certificate. You can get more information here. Check out the Spring 2020 schedule, and register for some classes! We’ll see you in the spring!

Finally, many thanks are due to those who made this issue so beautiful, inspiring, and memorable. Thank you to the entire Forum team, our hardworking editors, our even harder working instructors, and especially our Visual Media Design partners. But most of all, thank you to all the creators out there who let us publish your work. This wouldn’t be possible without you!

Check out some pictures from the night.

©Tigran Demurjian

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Tommy Orange: Pics and Recap

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©Tigran Demurjian

Wow! We had the immense honor of hosting Tommy Orange, author of There, There, at City College this past Wednesday. Mr. Orange was interviewed by CCSF instructor, activist, and author Benjamin Bac Sierra. He spoke about his recent novel and his plans for the future. This was great opportunity for the writers in the crowd because Mr. Orange spoke extensively about his writing process, the books and writers that have influenced him, and how he applies his past experience as a musician to his writing today. Mr. Orange then read a passage from his novel. It was amazing to see an author read their own work how they intended it to be read; his reading was powerful and inspiring. The event was concluded with a Q&A and book signing session.

This is only one of the many amazing events that Forum is involved with! Stay tuned for more–check the blog and our social media! And don’t forget about our Launch Party on December 18th 2019, from 6-9PM @Alley Cat Bookstore in the Mission District. Save the date!

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Photos ©Tigran Demurjian

TOMMY ORANGE @ CCSF

We have the immense honor of hosting Tommy Orange, Pulitzer Prize Finalist and author of There, There, at CCSF’s Ocean Campus. Come join Forum for the unique opportunity to hear a local author speak about this beautiful novel, on Wednesday Novemeber 20th, from 10:30 to 12:30, @ the Diego Rivera Theater at the Ocean Campus.

From the City College website:

“Tommy Orange is the author of There There, a multi-generational, relentlessly paced story about a side of America few of us have ever seen: the lives of urban Native Americans. Pulitzer Prize Nominee and one of The New York Times’ top books of 2018, There There shows us violence and recovery, hope and loss, identity and power, dislocation and communion, and the beauty and despair woven into the history of a nation and its people. Orange talks about his craft, the writing process, and Native American history and culture, often meticulously researched visual presentations.”

Members of the Forum team will be there! Stay tuned for a recap and pictures!

The event is free and open to the public.

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Queer Writing+AIDS Crisis Call For Submissions

 

 

Between Certain Death and a Possible Future:
Queer Writing on Growing up with the AIDS Crisis
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Hi all! Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore is looking to collect stories that narrate the queer experience in association with the AIDS crisis! Below is a description of the project, as well as guidelines, and Mattilda’s personal background. CHECK IT OUT!

Every queer person lives with the trauma of AIDS, and this plays out intergenerationally. Usually we hear about two generations—the first, coming of age in the era of gay liberation, and then watching entire circles of friends die of a mysterious illness as the government did nothing to intervene. And now we hear about a current generation growing up in an era offering effective treatment and prevention, and unable to comprehend the magnitude of the loss. We are told that these two generations cannot possibly understand one another, and thus remain alienated from both the past and the future. But there is another generation between these two—one growing up in the midst of the epidemic, haunted by the specter of certain death. A generation growing up with AIDS suffusing desire, internalizing the trauma as part of becoming queer. And these are the personal stories I’d like to collect in this book—accounts that overlap with the more commonly portrayed generations, and offer a bridge between.

By telling this specific generational story in all its complications, how do we explore the trauma the AIDS crisis continues to enact, and imagine a way out? How do race, class, gender, sexuality, age, ability, religion, ethnicity, indigeneity, rural/urban experience, regional/national origin, Global South/Global North perspective, HIV status, and access to treatment and prevention (over time and in shifting contexts) shape personal experience? What is excluded from the glorified myth of progress that now reigns?

How does the impact of growing up with the AIDS crisis continue to affect those left out of the white picket fence version of respectability promoted by dominant “LGBTQ” institutions? How does this apply to sex work, migration, public sex, cruising spaces and apps, abuse and survival, incarceration, reproductive health, homelessness, activism, drug use and addiction, subcultural striving, gay bar culture, HIV criminalization, and hierarchies within gay/queer/trans cultures?

Any generational frame offers only a partial truth, and I’m especially interested in the gaps between accepted narratives and lived experience. As a generation coming of age both with and without the internet, how has technology changed our lives, for better and worse? How does stigma against HIV-positive people continue today, and does the rhetoric around “undetectability” further exclusion rather than ending it? Who is dying of AIDS now, in spite of “AIDS Is Over” rhetoric? Has the energy around PrEP shifted the focus of public health campaigns away from demanding a cure for HIV? How could a meaningful intergenerational conversation about HIV/AIDS take place? What would communal care actually look like?

I’m interested in your most intimate stories, and your most personal fears—what you’re afraid to say is what I want to hear.

About the Editor: Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore (mattildabernsteinsycamore.com) is the author of three novels and a memoir, and the editor of five nonfiction anthologies. Her memoir, The End of San Francisco, won a Lambda Literary Award, and her widely hailed anthologies include Why Are Faggots So Afraid of Faggots?, That’s Revolting!, and Nobody Passes. Her latest novel, Sketchtasy (one of NPR’s Best Books of 2018), is about this generation between certain death and a possible future.

Guidelines: Please submit nonfiction personal essays of up to 5000 words, as Word attachments (no PDFs, please), to nobodypasses@gmail.com. Contributors will be paid for their work, and will receive copies of the book. Feel free to contact me with any queries. The deadline for submissions is March 1, 2020, but the sooner the better!

Forum Open Mic and Fundraiser

Hey guys!! Our official fundraiser and open mic event is happening next wednesday from 6:30-8:30 on the City College Mission Campus in room 109. The open mic is on a first-come-first-serve basis and has a 4-minute limit, so plan wisely. Everyone and anyone is welcome to join us! Come share your work with us and have a great evening! Food and drinks will be served 🙂 Hope to see you there!

Forum Open Mic - November 13

Author Reading: Carolina de Robertis

Join us at for a reading from Carolina De Robertis’ new novel Cantoras and a discussion about writing and its relationship with social change.

Monday, Novemeber 4th, from 1-2:30pm @ the Rosenberg Library at Ocean Campus, room 305.

Free and open to the public!

More about De Robertis:

A writer of Uruguayan origins, Carolina De Robertis is the author of the novels Cantoras, The Gods of Tango, Perla, and the international bestseller The Invisible Mountain. She is also an award-winning translator of Latin American and Spanish literature, and editor of the anthology Radical Hope: Letters of Love and Dissent in Dangerous Times, which features essays by leading thinkers and writers in response to the shifting political atmosphere in the U.S. In 2017, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts named De Robertis on its 100 List of “people, organizations, and movements that are shaping the future of culture.” She teaches fiction and literary translation at San Francisco State University, and lives in Oakland, California, with her wife and two children. Untitled-design-2-1

Poetry Reading: Joseph Lease

Join us tomorrow night at the Mission Campus at 6pm for a reading featuring Joseph Lease.

His critically acclaimed books of poetry include The Body Ghost (Coffee House Press, 2018), Testify (Coffee House Press, 2011), and Broken World (Coffee House Press, 2007). Lease’s poems “‘Broken World’ (For James Assatly)” and “Send My Roots Rain” were anthologized in Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology. Lease’s poem “‘Broken World’ (For James Assatly)” was anthologized in The Best American Poetry (Robert Creeley, Guest Editor). His poem “Free Again (Why don’t people)” was published in The New York Times.

Of The Body Ghost, David Shapiro wrote: “When I was very young, my father a ‘skin doctor’ would show gleaming models of body parts at medical fairs. They frightened my sisters but they were also illuminations of a whole world. Joseph’s poems are like these terrifying wholes/holes. They travel into us. Joseph has been 2 making an American Buddhist poetry, and he is as maximalist as flesh and bone. He gives me the sensation that poetry is in gleaming hands, healing and grasping and letting go. He is the future of poetry.”

CCSF’s Mission Campus, 1125 Valencia St., Room109
October 17, 2019 6:00-8:00 PM

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