Category Archives: Forum Magazine

Vicious, You Hit Me With A Flower by Natalie Saunders

VICIOUS, YOU HIT ME WITH A FLOWER
-Lou Reed. “Vicious”. Transformer

by Natalie Saunders

Poetry, like an essay or any piece of writing partaking of both literary composition and a theme of nature is green literature. Poetry differs, but only slightly in it’s presentation, from other forms of literary work. Usually, poetry incorporates rhythm and metaphor, and is both song and speech. Poetry’s sonic aspect allows the author to add stress on particular words by their placement or repetition. Punctuation can also be used to add stress on particular words or syllables. What constitutes a poem? And is a nature poem the same as a green poem? My theory is green literature is a message to humanity that asks that we recognize ourselves in the text and put an end to the desecration of nature. Some poems are meant for us to marvel at nature’s beauty and not a call for action. While it may not be the author’s intention, the appreciation of the imagery in their nature poem can influence our action. Poets can document their story differently than other fiction. Similarly, short stories manifest their green agenda more concisely than a novel. The elements of fiction in poetry are not always as blatant and at times can be abstract. Still the elements of fiction: setting, character/characterization, climax, plot, and theme that we’ve seen in various forms are present in poetry as they are in other forms of literature. Structure and a theme of nature constitute green literary composition. How the author illustrates their green theme (short story, essay, poem, novel) is a matter of preference. What’s important is that we recognize our relationship with nature. In this essay are three original poems that reflect on humanity’s nature (wicked, remorseful and speculative at times about the consequences of our endless invention), in three different styles that will be explained by their inspiration and relation to green literature.

Continue reading Vicious, You Hit Me With A Flower by Natalie Saunders

Speak To Me: Poetry From Survivors

Speak To Me: Poetry For Survivors

SPEAK TO ME: POETRY FROM SURVIVORS

Thursday, October 25
Ocean Campus
Cloud Hall Reading Garden
(Between Science and Cloud Halls at the Flagpole Plaza)

11 a.m. -12:30 p.m.

Join us for a free public poetry reading addressing domestic and sexual violence.

Refreshments will be provided.

Persons requiring disability-related accommodations for this event should contact Disabled Student Programs and Services at (415)452-5481. Please allow for 72 hours advance notice.

For more information and/or questions, please call (415) 239-3899.

This event was made possible by your $5 student activities fee.

Sponsored by Poetry for the People and Project SURVIVE and Associated Students.

Project Survive

 

ccsf approved for positng

 

Strung Together with Luke Sweeney and Wet Dreams Dry Magic

Strung Together with Luke Sweeney & Wet Dreams Dry Magic

Hey folks,

Just want to let y’all know the series is updated for our upcoming Nov. 5th show at Brick & Mortar! Please

Please

Please …

RSVP and share on your facebook / twitter / email blasts / whathaveyous so that the series gets as much exposure as possible. There is no facebook event because all promotion is sponsored by NoisePop’s Do415.com, which is where everyone attending should RSVP. The flier is also attached for your printing and spreading purposes. Remember, the show is free but the bands split up 20% of the bar ring, so the more drinkers we get through the door, the happier we’ll be at the end of the night.

There’s some additions to the evening’s itinerary as well…

Load-in 5:30, soundcheck 6. doors at 7.

7 – 8pm: DJ Neil Martinson

8 – 8:30: Colin Ludlow Mattson & The Folks

8:30 to 8:45: Short readings from contributing authors of Forum Magazine

8:45 – 9:15: Betsy and Beau

9:15 – 9:30: Short readings, raffle winners

9:30 – 10:15: Sea Dramas

10:15 – 10:35: DJ Neil Martinson

10:30 – 11:15: Luke Sweeney & Wet Dreams Dry Magic

11:15 – ? DJ Neil Martinson

Please feel free to coordinate with the other acts (including mine) if there is backline equipment you’d like to share, (i.e. amps & drums). Thanks in advance to all of you for contributing your many talents to what should be a beautiful harvest of music, literature, and revelry!

Cheers ~

~ Luke

lukesweeney.bandcamp.com

facebook.com/wetdreamsdrymagic

 

Forum Magazine Call For Submissions (Fall 2012)

Forum, the literary magazine of City College of San Francisco, gives voice to the talented authors, poets and visual artists in our community.

CCSF Forum Magazine Call For Submissions cover photo

 

Forum Magazine is looking for original works of Fiction, Non-Fiction, Poetry, Drama, Memoir, Essays, Photographs, Paintings, Etchings and more—anything literary or artistic.
Forum accepts submissions from City College of San Francisco students, alumni, faculty and staff.

On behalf of the entire Forum staff, I would like to thank you for your contribution to the magazine. We couldn’t do it without you.

Sincerely,

Jerome Steegmans,
Editor
Forum Magazine

 

“Bukowski” by Kristine Nodalo

Bukowski

by Kristine Nodalo

Charles Bukowski is one of the most prolific and vulgar writers out there. He stood at five feet eleven, often wearing a collared button-down shirt, with a chest pocket consisting of a few pens peeking out of it, covering a beer belly that hung over his waistline–a reminder of his romance with alcohol. His large, bulbous nose shadowed over stained nicotine yellow teeth. His ravaged face was marked with scars and blemishes, resembling the hard life he lived. He sauntered his way to each of the bars he made his second home and wrote at his first when he wasn’t. Nobody would have expected the success he had by just looking at him and his lifestyle, for Bukowski’s prose and poetry has been translated into twenty-one languages, sales for his books rise every year, and a great amount of avid Bukowski readers live all over the world. Charles Bukowski’s unique life experiences made him a successful writer, as they enabled him to color his writing with the kind of simplicity, tough, vicious honesty, and straight forwardness it bears that makes it different from others, revolutionizing literature and poetry, also providing consolation and representation, specifically for the underdogs of society—blue collared workers, prostitutes, and drunks—at the same time. Continue reading “Bukowski” by Kristine Nodalo

A Reading at L’s Caffe (May 31st (Updated!)

L’s Caffe have been kind enough to sponsor a reading/fundraiser for Forum.

Reading will be crime novelist and teacher Seth Harwood and poets Nic Alea and Aimee Suzara and possibly others (watch for updates). There will also be the usual open mic, maybe a raffle and, excitingly, the latest issue of Forum will be out so you’ll have your first chance to see (and/or purchase) the latest batch of poetry, prose and art from the CCSF community.

Thursday, May 31

L’s Caffe

2871 24th Street, SF CA
between Bryant + Florida

at 6:30 pm

Mostly Harmless and May 2nd

by Ayo Khensu-Ra

May 2nd has long held a sort of special aura for me. Improbably I reckoned some years ago that this was the date I picked up a certain book in the Hilo Public Library. While I wouldn’t say that book changed my life, it’s still one of my favorites — a strange mixture of science fiction, humor and gloom.

Anyone familiar with the series of which the book is a part will probably have guessed by now that I’m referring to the late Douglas Adams’ Mostly Harmless which was (amazingly) published some twenty years ago. I say amazingly because I was in middle school around that time an awkward, uncertain kid (it might be argued that I’m an awkward uncertain adult but that’s another story.)

The book is Adams’ final chapter in the series that began with The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy , a novel that was based on Adams’ own BBC radio program of the same name. Three books sit between the first and Mostly Harmless. They all center around the misadventures of Arthur Dent a fairly ordinary Englishman who just happens to be the last male survivor of the destruction of the Earth. I’ve enjoyed all the Hitchhiker’s books quite a lot but Mostly Harmless was the first I read and so is extra significant but something else I think draws me to that book in particular.

There’s a certain brilliance in Adams’ style. In each of his books he referenced and played with science fiction conventions bringing a kind of order through craziness. The books are very funny. Adams’ narrative voice is often calm, almost dry while discussing something completely absurd. But beyond that, Mostly Harmless has a rather intricate, intriguing plot. There are a number of threads to the story and there is a certain bigness to it that one might not expect from humorous science fiction novel. The elements of the story tie together wonderfully, everything falling right into place for the conclusion. It must also be said that the conclusion is far from a happy one which is something else that intrigues me about the novel–its mixture of comic and tragic. That mixture is something I later came to appreciate in the work of writer and director Joss Whedon (Whedon is probably best known as the creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the much-praised and oft-analyzed TV series; his take on Marvel’s The Avengers just arrived in theaters). While Whedon’s work is certainly more serious in tone, humor is one of his trademarks. I don’t want to get too carried away with analysis or overstate what Adams was trying to do but I do think Mostly Harmless and the other Hitchhikers’ books are more than mere light entertainment.  Mostly Harmless is wildly entertaining and it is extremely well-written, smart, witty and yes, a little grim. But if the arts are always on some level an attempt to make sense of life, the universe and everything then the comic and the tragic must inevitably meet.

Douglas Adams died in May of 2001, he was 49. I’ve often wondered what he would’ve written had he lived longer. He indicated that he might write another Hitchhikers’ book, that perhaps he might’ve liked to end the series on a happier note. A sequel to Mostly Harmless has been penned by Eoin Colfer. I haven’t read that book yet and while I probably will at some point, I can’t imagine it will be quite the same as reading Adams. At any rate, when May 2nd rolls around, I’m still reminded of picking up that book that evening in Hilo 20 years ago, the days and months afterward as I read through the series.

“How to Tell a True War Story” by Ava Stewart

How to Tell a True War Story

by Ava Stewart

Ava Stewart is a student at CCSF from Santa Cruz, CA. While spending a year in a half in Tucson at the University of Arizona, she studied the works of war author Tim O’Brien during in an English class over the course of a year. Shared below is a review of one of her favorite literary pieces, “How To Tell a True War Story,” a reflective piece O’Brien wrote to illustrate the rogue beauty of the  trauma and devastation he experienced during the Vietnam War.

O’Brien paints a stunning visual in “How to Tell a True War Story” that seeks to investigate the truth in war stories being told by Vietnam veterans. Whether exaggerations or fact, the narrator seeks to guide views as best as he can through his experiences in Vietnam when he was serving during the war. The narrator bases a majority of the story around the death of a close friend of his who was killed suddenly by a small land mine as he was walking in the forest of Vietnam. He follows this with other stories that occurred (or did they?) because of his passing. Continue reading “How to Tell a True War Story” by Ava Stewart

Another Forum Reading

Benjamin Bac Sierra author of the novel Barrio Bushido and poet Athena Kashyap whose work has appeared in Noe Valley Voice, Spork, The Fourth River and many others will be reading this coming Monday, May 7  in Visual Arts 114.  There will also be standard reading fare — an open mic as well as food and drink and a raffle.  Hope to see you there.