LIT NIGHT IS BACK!

Greetings Lit Night Friends,

Monday, May 17, 2021 7:30 PM  9:00 PM

Lit Night will find its way back home to Ocean Ale House!!! Please join us for a refreshing three-dimensional experience!

The theme is Guilt. More details can be found below:

https://www.litnight.org/themes

The sign-up sheet to be a featured reader or to read for the open mic portion will be up soon on the litnight.org website, but if you are eager to stake your spot you can email Chante McCormick (cmmccormi@ccsf.edu).

We will also have Lit Night Anthologies to give to contributors and to sell to anyone who wants one!

Hope to see you next week!

Chanté McCormick
English Faculty
City College of San Francisco

Where did Kelly wake up and why is there a cat named “Moocher”? Come find out by reading “The Oul Dear” by Wess Phillipson in Forum’s Fall 2020 Fiction!

Kelly blinked her eyes awake, but saw no difference in her vision. The room was absent of light, but she could tell this wasn’t her bed. Being a blackout drunk, she had become accustomed to waking up in strange places; but when she felt the flannel bedding, that’s when she knew she’d hit bottom. Kelly hadn’t slept on wool since she was a child. In fact, from the day she left Ireland and landed in San Francisco, she vowed that she would only ever lay on the finest feathers and softest satins for the rest of her life. Shunning her old rural lifestyle and her “culchie” farm mother who wielded Catholic guilt with all the wrath of the Old Testament. The “Oul Dear.”

……

When she tried to sit up, her head smashed against a low hanging flannel ceiling just above her head and an odd sense of detached relief washed over her. Thank God, she thought, at least I’m in a ……

To find out where Kelly woke up, head on over to Forum’s Fall 2020 Fiction and check out some amazing stories. The “Oul Dear” by Wess Phillipson can be found on page 2, accessed by clicking the picture below

Artwork: Cara Pademica by Vilma M. Ronzon

*Featured photo by Annaleah Gregoire

CCSF’s Creative Writing Program Visiting Writer Series, presents Poet Michael Leong!

Poet Michael Leong

Reading plus Q&A

Thursday, April 8th, 2021

6:00 PM

Free and open to the public

Michael Leong is the author of the critical study Contested Records: The Turn to Documents in Contemporary North American Poetry (University of Iowa Press, 2020) and the poetry books e.s.p. (Silenced Press, 2009), Cutting Time with a Knife (Black Square Editions, 2012), Who Unfolded My Origami Brain? (Fence Digital, 2017), and Words on Edge (Black Square Editions, 2018). His creative work has been anthologized in THE &NOW AWARDS 2: The Best Innovative Writing (Lake Forest College Press, 2013), Best American Experimental Writing 2018 (Wesleyan University Press, 2018), and Bettering American Poetry, Volume 3 (Bettering Books, 2019). His co-translation, with Ignacio Infante, of Vicente Huidobro’s long poem Sky-Quake: Tremor of Heaven was published by co•im•press in 2020. He has received grants from the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Join us on Zoom through Eventbrite

Rubber Ducky

Angela Buen Alberto

Duck taking a bubble bath
Rubber Ducky, Angela Buen Alberto, Digital art

Angela Buen Alberto is a graphic designer and illustrator from the Bay Area. She is currently studying graphic design at CCSF to obtain a certificate. She loves creating amusing, whimsical, sometimes melancholy work, and is heavily inspired by her childhood. You can find her work and more about her on her Instagram: angela.b.alberto 

Spring Submissions Closed;

“Poetry is the shadow cast by our streetlight imaginations.”
― Lawrence Ferlinghetti

Regular submissions for Forum Magazine are closed.

Special flash call of submissions in honor of Lawrence Ferlinghetti due by March 5th, Midnight PST are now closed.

**Photo credit of Lawrence Ferlinghetti is “Happy Birthday Lawrence Ferlinghetti” by Christopher.Michel is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Fiction Reading with Mimi Lok

The Creative Writing Program at City College of San Francisco is delighted to host a reading and discussion with fiction writer Mimi Lok!

Mimi Lok is the author of the story collection Last Of Her Name, published October 2019 by Kaya Press. She is the winner of the 2020 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut short story collection, a California Book Award silver medal, and a Smithsonian Ingenuity Award. She is also a finalist for the 2020 National Magazine Award, Northern California Book Award, and CLMP Firecracker Award. Mimi’s work can be found in McSweeney’s, Electric Literature, Lucky Peach, Hyphen, the South China Morning Post, and elsewhere. She is currently working on a novel. Mimi is also the founding director and executive editor of Voice of Witness, an award-winning human rights & oral history nonprofit that amplifies marginalized voices through a book series and a national education program. UK-born and raised, she has lived and worked in China and is currently based in the US.

When

Tue, March 2, 2021
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM PST

Where

Register on Eventbrite to access the Zoom invitation!
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fiction-reading-with-mimi-lok-tickets-142303362187

2021-03-02T19:00:00

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GET LIT

Lit Night is back! Have you been churning out poems and stories and essays that you are desperate to share ? Are you perhaps looking for inspiration and a regular meet up with fellow writers?

Next Lit Night fun is March 15th. The theme is PERFECT MATCH.

Visit litnight.org for themes, dates and Zoom links!

Lit Night is every third Monday from 7:30-9:00PM

Come join the fun!

Lit+Night+Logo+white

 

STATEMENT TO OUR COMMUNITY REGARDING ALAN CHAZARO READING

Alan Chazaro

February 16, 2021

To the CCSF and Forum Community,

The English Department and the Creative Writing program at City College wish to extend our apologies to all of you who attended Alan Chazaro’s poetry reading on Thursday, February 11th. We felt honored to have Alan read for us since, in addition to being a talented poet, he attended community college and went on to write about growing up in the Bay Area as a Mexican American. Alan received the Lawrence Ferlinghetti Scholarship at the University of San Francisco because of his focus on and commitment to social justice issues in America, and it is clear he is someone that many of us can see ourselves in and that he is a truly inspirational man.

In fact, Alan represents much of what we stand for at City College—a commitment to social equity and diversity. We are proud of our tradition of presenting writers of all races, ethnicities, and gender identities. For this reason, the attack on the reading that occurred when a group of intruders disrupted and insulted the poet and viewers, represents an assault on our values. As you may know, the group took over the Zoom screen and projected racist and pornographic images while they verbally attacked all present in the chat. This was a hate filled act that has no place at any college, let alone City College. City College’s Visiting Writers’ Series is about inclusivity and about presenting diverse voices that will help students, faculty, and Bay Area residents build a supportive and inclusive community based on love and acceptance.

We wish to extend deep and heartfelt thanks to Alan Chazaro for the generous gift of his poems and much gratitude to our audience for their patience and support. It was amazing to hear students immediately reject the intruders’ hate and turn to highlighting the connections they could make to his life and poems. It was inspiring to hear many of you mentioning favorite passages.

We strongly condemn these racial attacks on our presenter and audience members. After reflecting on the intrusion, we have made the following changes to how our online Visiting Writers’ Series events will be managed:

· All participants will be muted throughout the events and will be individually unmuted if they have raised their hand during the Q and A.

· Participants will not be able to change their screen names during an event.

· Participants will not be able to screenshare.

· At least one faculty member will manage the waiting room and settings while another hosts the event.

· All faculty hosting or cohosting a reading will be trained to manage disruptions.

· Chat may be restricted to the host only and disabled entirely if abused.

· Removed participants will not be able to rejoin the event.

· Members of the public will be required to register for the event with their full name and email address before receiving the Zoom link and password.

· Participants without first and last names in their profile will not be allowed in the meeting.

· Any attendee who attempts to disrupt the event will be reported to Zoom and our IT department as well as CCSF administrators.

We hope that all of you—and anyone who attends any of the English Department’s future events—will feel safe knowing that we have put in place measures to ensure that such intrusion will never occur again. We are dedicated to bringing a diverse range of writers—writers of all races, gender identifications, and religions—who honor inclusivity and the power of literature to bring people together in the spirit of love—and never hate.

Sincerely,

CCSF Creative Writing Program and English Department

magic spell

Linocut landscape

You will need
–A preying mantis rescued from a lawnmower
–Five ants rescued from a kitchen where
the balabosta was going to crush them.
–A wrapped piece of grocery cake
Hostess
or my new favorite that comes from Mexico
white cake covered in chocolate with some
spots of red jelly Gansito
–Your favorite pair of colored socks
–Your favorite pair of comfortable worn-out socks
–A book you’re been meaning to read
–Miscellaneous secret government files
–My mother Felice’s fountain pen with something
in her handwriting
–My father Eli’s thimble he used as a tailor
–One of my grandfather Wulf’s Hebrew Prayer Books
–Something my grandmother Rachel has sewn

–A short piece played on the piano by my
sister Ruth
–The smell of the beach of Riis Park on a
hot summer’s day
–A worn pair of my dance shoes
–The tights I started to knit and stopped at the
calf of the second leg and then forgot
how to knit altogether
–Photos of the local people who went to see
the last performance of Beach Blanket Babylon
closing after forty-five years including Nancy Pelosi, Diane Feinstein
and Dick Blum
–Some of the DNA from elephants, lions,
giraffes, feral cats
–Some bit of giant Redwoods and Sequoias
–The wisps of laughter, puzzlements,
revelations
of my now gone family and friends

(Add all of yours)
Whoosh them all together
in a beautiful canyon someplace in
New Mexico

where they will create
a whirling–like a soft tornado
up to the horizon

and out to cover the world
And surely this will save the
human species in 2020.

Helen Dannenberg writes with the Older Writers Lab. She takes various arts-related classes and featured her assemblages in Open Studios 2019. She participates with San Francisco Recreation and Parks Cosmic Elders and has been a dancer and choreographer, and worked as an Activity Director and Social Services Coordinator in skilled nursing facilities.

Cedar Pass, Linocut print, by Teresa Beatty

A San Francisco based artist, Teresa Beatty has spent the last few years honing her skills in printmaking and drawing. Her interests span from scientific illustration to art therapy. In pursuit of bettering her craft she’s traveled across the globe. She uses art as a tool for healing, expression and connection.

sifted bones

Pine Cone

Crimson bleeds
on her clean pink jumper,
blooming,
like Poppies in October,
the Plath poem
which has nothing to do with poppies,
the wounded woman’s
heart a watercolor seeping.

Fresh ruby drops
just as we were ready to go home,
declaring a reminder
that everything is not normal, everything
is not as it should be, but the portals are open
the veins are still alert,
dripping,
as the nurse removes the plastic tubing dangling from the crook of her arm,
a thief tapping into a pot of gold
striking it rich before her veins collapse.

I want to slide inside
a pair of Emily‘s flannel pajamas,
slip into my bed and pretend that everything
will be fine,
that she will be here
to create art with me in my retirement
in her little downstairs studio,
with gelli plates
squeezing tubes of fine gold acrylic
rolling, watching it smear and shine
translucent spreading
onto every inch of plain paper.

Snuggling beside her
in the hospital bed feeling her beating
heart, holding
her hand and we are laughing
at Jim Carrey impugning god in Bruce Almighty
when she asks me quietly,
Do you know whether you want to be cremated or what?
Emily who has organized everything
down to the intimate
notes she has kept for 20 years,
then carefully hand bound into a creative atlas
to celebrate a life,
has not prepared her burial plans.
She is leaving
that up to us to spread
her sifted bones.

Diana Feiger grew up in Sandwich, Kent, UK and moved to the Bay Area in 1986. She finds inspiration in nature and from the miraculous and mundane aspects of life. Small moments and phrases can capture the imagination.

Happy Pine Cone, Charcoal Drawing by Travis Yallup

Travis Yallup is a contemporary realist who lives and works in San Francisco. He has studied art at various colleges and universities over the past eleven years and has developed a preference for drawing and painting in a variety of mediums. His  focus usually comes from life, photos, and collages and he often draws an inspiration from influences such as Andrew Wyeth and Vija Celmins.