Category Archives: Forum Magazine

Thank you for your submissions!

We here at Forum Magazine just wanted to thank everyone who submitted their work!  We received a great amount of submissions this semester from a lot of excellent talent, and we’re busy sorting through everything and making the extremely tough decision of what to include in this spring’s issue.

We couldn’t put this publication together without your wonderful contributions, and thanks to you we’re gearing up for a superb publication to release in May.  Best of luck to you all in the selection process, and once again grazie, xie xie, merci, spasibo, gracias, asante!  Forum exists thanks to you and our wonderful community!

Forum Spring 2014 submission deadline has been extended to February 25th!

Good news, everyone!  We’ve been able to extend our Spring 2014 submission deadline to February 25th!

This means there’s still time to get us your fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, photography, art and comics to submissions@forumccsf.org for your chance to be published.

You don’t need to be a student to submit, so spread the word.  We’re looking forward to seeing all your great work for consideration in our upcoming issue!

Please visit our submissions page for more info on submission guidelines.

Fall 2013 Release Party Photos

Thank you to everyone who showed up to Cafe la Boheme on Sunday, February 9th for our Fall 2013 issue release party!  We had a great turnout and were able to raise some funds for our Spring 2014 issue, thanks to all of your generous support.

We now have some photos up on our Facebook page of the event.  Please check them out, and “like” our page to keep up-to-date on Forum Magazine news!

A round of applause to everyone who came by to read your work and show your support.  We can’t put together great events like these without you.  See you next time!

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Fall 2013 Release Party Tomorrow at Cafe la Boheme

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This is a reminder to come join us tomorrow for the release of Forum Magazine’s Fall 2013 edition!

Café la Bohème will be hosting our Fall 2013 release party, which will feature an open mic, music, and a raffle.

Share your work on the open mic, listen to the latest talent in the CCSF community, and enjoy all of the delicious food and drink the brilliant Café la Bohème has to offer.

Tomorrow, Sunday, February 9th

3318 24th Street, San Francisco

5-8 pm

See you there!

You’re Invited: Forum Magazine’s Fall 2013 Release Party

lCome join us for the release of Forum Magazine’s Fall 2013 edition!

Café la Bohème will be hosting our Fall 2013 release party, which will feature an open mic, music, and a raffle.

Come join us to purchase your Fall 2013 edition of Forum, share your work on the open mic, listen to the latest talent in the CCSF community, and enjoy all of the delicious food and drink the brilliant Café la Bohème has to offer.

Sunday, February 9th

3318 24th Street, San Francisco

5-8 pm

Hope to see you there!

Accepting Submissions for Spring 2014

Forum is now accepting submissions for the Spring 2014 edition!

Submit your fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, photography, art and comics to submissions@forumccsf.org by February 18th for your chance to be published!

Please visit our submissions page for more info on submission guidelines.

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We’re looking forward to another great issue thanks to your talented work.  Please spread the word!

Our Fall 2013 issue is out!

Our Fall 2013 issue is out!

It’s finally time for everyone else to see the magazine in print! Come celebrate our new issue with us on Sunday, February 9th at Cafe La Boheme (3318 24th Street, San Francisco) from 5pm to 8pm. Here are the top five reasons why you should come to this event:

1. We want to meet you, fellow Forum readers!
2. Meet some of the wonderful contributors whose talents make up this issue.
3. Delicious food.
4. Raffles!
5. Lastly, inspire or be inspired during our Open Mic.

We hope to see you there!

The Ambivalent Protaganist

by Casey Baker

Recently, Huffington Post published an article (link:http://www.huffingtonpost.com/claire-fallon/great-male-protagonists-w_b_4044741.html) naming a few male protagonists from famous novels that no one would really wish to befriend if they existed in the real world. While the piece is an interesting, rather pro-feminist examination of generally brutish male characters, it leaves out an entire gender and examination therein.

Which led me to consider, of all of the characters I’ve met in the great Imagi-sphere that is the act of reading, which ones have I encountered who were both entirely compelling and also incredibly off-putting? Here are my top five.

1. Esther Greenwood, The Bell Jar – While Sylvia Plath’s semi-autobiographical novel is a strong examination of the stilted social mores of women during a specific time in history and the effects of those mores that still holds great weight today, Esther is someone I would never want to simply ‘hang out’ with. This isn’t to say she is an uninteresting protagonist, rather the opposite – as the old adage goes, “Misery loves company” and Esther’s way of thinking is so relatable to anyone who has lived under the oppressive, patriarchal hetero-normative society that still informs our culture today. A day with Esther would involve venting together, crying to let it all go, and then feeling miserable for the rest of the day. The novel is enough catharsis.

2. Tyler, Shampoo Planet (Douglas Coupland) – Tyler is what Coupland labels a “Global Teen” and part of Generation Y, a generation that I unfortunately belong to simply by a matter of years. Tyler embodies everything I dislike about my generation, including a mindless adherence to consumerism that even reaches into a desire to be a corporate CEO simply because corporations control so much of the consumer media, a misplaced admiration in Reaganomics, flightiness in both life and love, and a copious amount of hair products to keep up a facade of stability and self-assuredness. By the end of the novel, Tyler finally realizes that his interests are transient and not based on anything real or sincere, but by then he has already ruined things for himself in many ways. I suppose a part of what I dislike about Tyler is that he does remind me of some elements of myself at a much younger, more naive age.

3. Clay (Bateman?), Less Than Zero (Bret Easton Ellis) – Clay is a spoiled, rich Southern California jerk. His friends are detestable, his life is by and large meaningless, and he is generally an amoral bit of driftwood, floating along a tide of drugs, sex and unhappiness. While Clay is fascinating because his life does well to satirize much of the LA culture and its excesses in a very dark series of parties and meaningless relationships, he is also someone who would casually sit across a dinner table with you, coked up and barely paying attention. A real sleezeball. It doesn’t help that his brother is possibly the one and only American Psycho, Patrick Bateman.

4.  Shannon McFarland/Daisy St. Patience/Bubba Joan/Whatever, the narrator of Invisible Monsters (Chuck Palahniuk) – After getting her face shot off, the narrator of Invisible Monsters meets the queen of train-wrecks, Brandy Alexander, and the two go on a pill-stealing, soap-operatic crime spree of epic proportions. While the narrator and her story are hilarious and continuously compelling throughout the several ridiculous plot turns of the story, she’s also incredibly psychotic and someone you wouldn’t even trust with your dying houseplant. Steer clear of this brand of crazy, despite how fabulous she seems.

5. Ms. Valerie Frizzle, The Magic Schoolbus – While the idea of shrinking into microscopic sizes and exploring the cells of the body or diving deep into the dark, black ocean with a bus submersible seem incredibly fun for any kid, the reality of the situation is that this woman is more than a little deranged, willing to put her students right into the jaws of danger just to teach them a lesson about plant chlorophyll or the inner workings of stomach acid. Ms. Frizzle is a dangerous woman with dangerous ideas.

What are your type five fiction frenemies?