Category Archives: Forum Magazine

Results! (The Sinister Symposium)

By Ellie MacBride | 

For those of you who missed it, last night (October 23rd) was a great turn-out! Jazz guys ran late, Joseph Lease was falling asleep on a big purple chair, and I was freaking out…but that was just the beginning! By the time the reading started, it flowed like a soda fountain and ran smooth as a Mission low-rider. Kwame was the first featured reader, followed by Seth Harwood (who brought in an incredible CD collection (Seal, Old Dirty Bastard, all the classics…) and stack of notebooks to give away.) The night continued with a beat-influenced young poet named Paul Roccanova and ended with poet Joseph Lease, who had requested to go last and even got an encore!

Our open mic started with Loren Bell, a teacher at CCSF, who read three incredible poems (one of his own) while being accompanied by Steve and Craig on guitar and bass. The night continued with a few wonderful poems by Ayo, short story by Kyanne, even shorter story by me, a few vignettes by Dillon Petrillo, and a special guest appearance by Terry Richardson, who actually just ended up being my friend Alex Greenburg, the only one who wore a costume. There were complimentary chips (provided by Kwame) and refreshments available by donation all night.

The space was intimate, vibrantly decorated, kinda kitschy, and perfect for our reading and we were so lucky to be offered it at no charge. We auctioned off a couple Forums, and ended up making ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS on the dot, which is great considering we pretty much spent NO money!

Ellie MacBride is Forum’s general editor.

The Sinister Symposium! – Mark Your Calendars (10/23)

And really, where else would you go for your Halloween-themed literary events? Yes, music, refreshments as well as  Joseph Lease, Seth Harwood, Paul Roccanova, our own Kwame Opoku-Duku III live and in person. Plus a Halloween game or two with what will undoubtedly be fabulous prizes, perhaps a costume contest  and an open mic so check it out.

kaleidoscope

http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=157448387680695

Thanks to Dillon Petrillo for the flyer.

Deadline Approaching – October 1st

It has been a slightly slow start to the fall semester here at Boeotia but that should be changing soon. It is important to note, however, that the deadline for submissions for the fall issue of Forum is fast approaching. As you may have surmised that deadline is this Saturday, the first of October, so get those poems, stories, photographs, paintings and whatever else in!

Further submission information is available here.

A Very Important Date

Please join us to celebrate this semester’s issue of Forum, CCSF’s literary magazine, hot off the press! Come to the reading and check out the stunning cover of this edition, which features work by CCSF faculty, students and staff [past and present].

Wednesday May 18 5-8pm
Visual Arts 114

Light refreshments will be served. Copies of the new issue [as well as back issues] will be for sale.

See you there!

My Stories Are Ending

by Joseph Ramelo

It’s been said that if Shakespeare were alive today, his bread and butter would be writing for soap operas. Sure, he’d probably still conjure up a Hamlet or Macbeth. But his day job? Probably similar to that of Agnes Nixon, the creator of All My Children and One Life To Live, two longtime daytime television series that last week received the axe from ABC Daytime, their longtime home . The genre has existed since the days of radio broadcasting. The term “soap opera” derives from when the radio series were sponsored by detergent makers. Soap operas seamlessly crossed mediums when television replaced the radio in dominance.

When appreciating the arts and literature, one can like what one likes, but must also leave at least a special appreciation for certain forms that might be outside of the normative realm. Forum and Boeotia aspire to recognize and comment on the arts and literature in their myriad forms, and it is the opinion of this Assistant Blog Editor that daytime television series are worthy of as much literary analysis (and respect) as the classics produced by Austin and Bronte.

ABC Daytime will now only have one soap opera on the air. General Hospital is the highest-rated soap opera out of the three that lived this long into the 21st century and, quite frankly, I don’t have the slightest idea why. Out of the three series, GH was my favorite, but the writing quality declined significantly beginning sometime around the turn of the century. Felicia Scorpio is not a deadbeat mother. Laura Spencer is not a helpless invalid. Her son Lucky is not a philanderer. The mob has no business being in control of the entire city — the show is called General Hospital!

But that’s just me being a fan. I will miss my stories, particularly One Life To Live, which in recent years had made a quiet resurgence — “quiet” because it was overshadowed by the attention the network heaped on GH. Not only does OLTL have the most solid writing out of the three ABC Daytime soaps, the production values are much more impressive than what one might expect from a meager soap opera. Cinematography, scoring, direction: you name it, that series churned it out every week day.

As a literature fan, I am mourning in the same manner as I am for the constantly looming death of print media. But newspapers, magazines, and even book stores are on track to cheat death. All My Children will end this September, One Life to Live by January. An art form has truly come to an end.

Found in translation

Poetry, Poesie, Poesia

By James H. Miller

I have an undying respect for poetry translators. I’ve never had the patience or discipline to truly learn a foreign language myself. I tried Spanish so that I might read Cesar Vallejo in the original, attempted German because I thought Goethe was really rad, and then French for similar reasons—Rimbaud, you bad-ass!

I usually managed to earn a passing grade or better in these courses, but my actual knowledge of any foreign language amounts to funny vulgarities and swear words. So, if you’re like me (my sympathies if you are), those who translate poetry into English are crucial; whether it’s unearthing a master from Argentina, or showing us what, as O’Hara wrote, “the poets in Ghana are doing these days.” In recent years, we’ve been blessed with loads of groundbreaking translations from people like Edward Snow, Clare Cavanagh, and many other erudite guys and gals. I’d like to mention two translators that I’m personally grateful for: Michael Hofman and Jonathan Galassi.

First, Michael Hofman.

Michael Hofman was born in West Germany in 1957. Among other things (poet, free-lance writer), he’s an excellent translator and winner of countless awards. He most recently edited an anthology sensibly called Twentieth-Century German Poetry, which includes fine translations of poems by Rainer Maria Rilke, Bertolt Brecht, and Paul Celan, along with many obscure others who’ve never, to my knowledge, been rendered into English so handsomely before. Continue reading Found in translation